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RESPOND TO STUDENT POSTS

Ciara post
 
change management is very important for any business to be successful. Change management offers support to the businesses employees and offers different techniques to achieve the whatever the ultimate goal is.
Management is a very inportant role within any business but that manager must possess leadership skills for the business to be successful. One of my jobs started to shift supervisors around to change the culture and dynamics of the business. Diversity within a company is needed and should always be apart of the organizations culture. My department got a new supervisor and although we loved the recent supervisor we needed someone to come in with a different approach. The new supervisor came in and learned the new system and now jumps on the phone to help us when we need help which is often. The last supervisor would always be available to answer or questions but would never help answer calls. Although answering calls is not her job, as a leader you help your team with anything that is needed. The new supervisor came in and has already improved the organizations dynamics.

Thomas post
I’ve worked for a publicly held company for 18 years. When I started, I gave little thought to change. Quite frankly, I was resistant. As I moved up in the company my views changed. Change management is critical to the short and long term health of any company. Regardless of your line of work, change must be addressed and embraced. Since I work for a home builder, change is obviously critically important. We are constantly changing products, fits and finishes. We must quickly adapt to the market. It could be price point, interest rates, location or interior finishes that must be constantly monitored and adapted to. If you’re slow to change, you could miss the market, lose sales and cost people their jobs. With all of that said, sometimes change just for the sake of changing can be as equally damaging. One must be thoughtful, research the issue multiple times, get buy in from internal and external sources, and ensure the decision to change is being made for these right reasons, not emotion, before moving forward.

Samantha meadow post
 I have never heard of someone being left-brained or right-brained. I found the video “Split Brain Behavioral Experiment” very interesting. I’ve never heard of someone being able to draw what they saw, but not say what they saw. Our brain is such an interesting organ, it’s very complex and constantly being studied. We are learning more and more about the brain as the years go on. If someone were to tell me that they were right-brained or left-brained, my first question would be, “How do you know?” I am curious as to how you find this out without a study being conducted on you. I found an article on sciencedirect.com that mentions that the hemispheric specialization is relative and fluid over absolute. “The most common finding was that both hemispheres were capable of performing both modes of processing included within each of the dichotomies, with occasional instances of superior performance by one hemisphere, in line with predictions. (Rosser, 2009)” The results from the study in the video did surprise me. I wasn’t really sure how it’s possible to not be able to say what you saw but draw it. It was very shocking to me with what the results were in the video. My husband is right-handed, and I am interested in conducting an experiment on him to see if I am able to determine if he is left-brained or right-brained.

 Madison post
 
Humans do have hemispheric specialization, as shown in the video “Split Brain Behavioral Experiment.” For example, the man was shown two different images- he consciously processed the image on the left, say, a car, but then would draw the image he saw on the right (with his left hand), a saw. However, we know that this specialization is not set in stone from the story of Michelle Mack. Most likely due to a prenatal stroke, she was born without 95% of the left hemisphere of her brain. While she does have some delays and disabilities, her brain adapted to this absence well enough that she was able to graduate high school and hold a job working in data entry. The cause of her disabilities was not discovered until she was 27 years old. The right side of her brain amply compensated for the missing tissue, letting her function better than doctors could have believed.
Hemispheric specialization is not just malleable, but relative (Gingras & Braun, 2018). While people do show strengths towards tasks managed on one side or the other, at the end of the day this varies due to age, task, training, and more. 

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