Police Report

Police Report Tomas Gonzalez, University of Phoenix CJA/304 February 26, 2013 Oscar N. Ruiz Police Report There are various types of communication used through the criminal justice process, considering the witness, prosecution, judge, and defense they all have their own element of communication to get their message across effectively and to prove their point. Communication for Prosecution and Defense The type of communication used by the prosecution or defense is typically more formal than informal and consists mainly of verbal communication.
Non-verbal communication becomes more prevalent when arguing points in front of a jury. The prosecution may offer a deal or plea bargain to the defense in an effort to avoid the expense and time involved with a trial. If a deal is not offered or reached, it is likely that the case will go to trial. At trial, the judge governs the communication by either the prosecution or the defense. Each party may object to something said by the other and the judge will rule on if the information is acceptable. The two parties will argue their case to the jury and in doing say may make use of non-verbal communication to try and sway the jury.
I like to view it as the difference between an actor acting as though they have tripped (verbal communication) and someone such as Jerry Lewis or Jim Carey using their physical humor to exaggerate or enhance the trip (non-verbal communication). Communication for the Witness and Judge The Judge uses both oral and written forms of communication, written forms usually go to the juries which include instructional sheets on how to be a proper juror and written paper work between both prosecution and defense attorney which can be anything from a warrant to a bail amount.

A judge also listens to the oral statements during the case to ensure the case is handled proper and asks questions or controls the prosecution or defense when needed. A judge may also give instructions to the jury during the case, such as acknowledging a piece of evidence or dismissing one, or dismissing a statement that may contaminate the case and jury. The judge may also hold a person in contempt for acting out in a courtroom or delaying the case, the judge will also make opening and closing statements addressing all those in the courtroom.
The Witness will be using oral forms of communication. A witness is a person that has knowledge of the case they are involved in. Their testimony can either help or hurt a defendant. Both the prosecution and defense have witnesses. Written and oral communications are used within the courtroom in the Minnesota v. Riff case. In this case the prosecution has many witnesses that have information implementing Riff for the crime. Once the prosecution asks their questions the defense then has their turn.
The defense attorney asks the witnesses questions in regards to what they said when the prosecution asked them questions and they also ask the witnesses their own questions. The defense attorney tries to pick apart the witnesses stories to help his client. The witnesses for the defense team usually tell a different story from the prosecution witnesses. The prosecution then has their time to cross examine. The written communications that are usually presented are the statements that are gathered at the time of the incident.
When witnesses are first questioned at the scene they give information such as; the time of the incident, exact details of what happened, and where it happened. Police Report S-3839410 BURGLARY ASSIGNMENT/ARRIVAL At 00:30, Officer Terry Schield was dispatched to investigate a burglary call at Marquette’s Market, which is on the corner of Main Street and First Street in Midtown, Minnesota. INVESTIGATION Officer Terry Schield began his investigation of the burglary and discovered the following: The rear door lock of Marquette’s Market had been smashed open with a heavy blunt object.
The cash register drawer had been similarly smashed open and was empty except for $7. 83 in coin and two checks (one for $10. 00 and the second for $5. 80) In the alley next to the store, Officer Terry Schield found a heavy hammer with fingerprints wiped clean. COMPLAINTANT’S STATEMENT Speedy Marquette the storeowner said that $910. 00 had allegedly been taken from the cash drawer of the register. The money had been placed in a tan cash bag labeled “Midtown State Bank”. The alleged burglary would have had to occur between 00:00 and 00:25. In the $910. 0 was a Canadian five-dollar bill. WITNESS’S STATEMENT Outside of the Marquette Market Officer Terry Schield found Soapy Waters, the janitor at Mickey’s Diner and Otis Ripple, the baker at Midtown Bakery. Mr. Waters stated that he had seen Ronnie Riff in the area at about 00:20. That Riff had been carrying a tan moneybag and had dropped two dollars from the bag. Riff was wearing blue jeans and a blue band jacket. Mr. Ripple the nightshift baker at Midtown Bakery stated that around 00:15 he had seen someone exit the market by the rear door.
The person threw something into the side alley east of the store. Officer Terry Schield took Mr. Ripple to the location and Mr. Ripple found the hammer. When Officer Terry Schield asked to identify who was at the rear door of Marquette Market Mr. Ripple refused to identify the person he saw. Rusty Fender owner of Rusty’s Auto Body had to close his shop at 00:30 because he misplaced his hammer. He stated that at 00:00 he had seen Riff behind the Fenders Body Shop. Mr. Fender identified the hammer found in the side alley east of market as his.
Melvin Strongarm stated he played poker with Riff the night of the alleged burglary and stated that Riff won $200. 00 that night. At 00:25, Betty Biddy nurse at Midtown Memorial Hospital and neighbor of Ronnie Riff stated she saw Riff toss away a tan bag. She stated the bag was labeled “Midtown State Bank. ” The bag has not yet been found. C. Sharp owner of Sharp’s Music Store stated Ronnie had purchased a guitar for $875. 00 from Sharp’s Music city. Riff paid cash and tried to include a Canadian five-dollar bill in the payment.
Guido Concertino owner of the Midtown Dance Magic stated Riff practiced on the guitar worth $900. 00 at the “Midtown Dance Magic”. References: Rights of the Accused Minnesota v. Ronald Rif: A Criminal Mock Trial. (n. d. ). Retrieved from http://sharepdf. net/view/59954/minnesota-v-ronald-riff-a-criminal-mock-trial Wallace, H. & Roberson, C. (2009). Written and interpersonal communication: Methods for law enforcement (4th ed. ). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

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